Tag Archive: Upcycling

Recycle Magazines Into Home Decor & More

Many curbside recycling programs accept magazines along with office paper and newspapers. Another common way to reuse magazines is clipping out pictures to create a collage image, which is usually hung up as a poster or used to decorate gifts. Those are great uses, but we’re here to take recycling magazines to the next level. First there’s an overview of some really neat products that show how far you can go when you recycle magazines. There’s also a great selection of recycled magazine crafts for inspiration. Read and recycle onward!

Can You Recycle Magazines? Yes

Take a look at this spiffy room divider. It is actually four feet tall and handcrafted from recycled magazine pages folded and woven into panels. Makes for a good fire place size screen or set in front of a desk or table.

recycle magazines

 

The square mirror below is three inches thick and is over 16X16 inches- that’s a lot of recycled magazines!

recycle magazines

This magazine vase is another great way to recycle magazines. All you need is a fresh flower and you’re good to go!

recycled magazine vase

Recycled magazine coasters literally round out our look at ways you can recycle magazines, and cool products into which they’re recycled.

recycle magazines

 

By purchasing any of the products through the links above, you have supported our website as well as a waste recycling program that incorporates very clever design and upcycling of materials.

Recycled Magazine Crafts

Definitely don’t throw old magazines into the trash if they can be placed in a recycling bin or taken to a recycling center. Go beyond the bin and use the pages found within for really cool projects:

  • Gift bows. Make recycled gift bows out of old magazines! Here’s the instructions.
  • Piñatas. Torn out pages from magazines work well to decorate a homemade piñata.
  • Bowls. Continue to flex your creative crafting muscles as you create a magazine bowl.

When it comes to creatively reusing common paper items you have around your house, it doesn’t stop there. If you think recycling magazines is fun, check out the great stuff we found made with recycled newspapers.

Links to products featured on RecycleScene are affiliate links. We try and only feature products that close the recycling loop. Make a purchase of recommended products on our site, and we get a small percentage of affiliate commission to maintain our site. Thanks!

A Perfect Way to Reuse & Recycle Old Globes

We love to bring you the best recycling stories from around the globe, and the handcrafted artwork of Wendy Gold is literally on top of the world. Each vintage globe is hand-cut and decoupaged before  finishing to create a sense of travel, adventure, and a message of peace. Each globe has had a prior life, so is full of character. Hunting for treasures at flea markets is a favorite pastime for Gold, and is what lead to her to found ImagineNations in 2010.

Her work was instantly recognized for its originality and quickly garnered a clientele including celebrities, along with retailers, restaurants, hotels, interior designers, and home décor enthusiasts.

A couple years ago I happened upon the most beautiful globe. Inspiration struck on the spot.”

recycle globes

Vintage globes artfully decoupaged by by Wendy Gold.

She also finds her globes at flea markets, eBay, estate sales, and a fair amount from people who are trying to downsize their possessions.

Links to products featured on RecycleScene are affiliate links. We try and only feature products that close the recycling loop. Make a purchase of recommended products on our site, and we get a small percentage of affiliate commission to maintain our site. Thanks!

Simple & Easy Ideas for Recycled Birdhouses

More than 50 different North American birds will use a built birdhouse, and birdhouses made from recycled materials are simple and easy to make. You may see an old plastic coffee container, but we see a “new” home for our feathered friends. Recycled birdhouses are made from common everyday materials such as salvaged wood, plastic containers, a hollowed out gourd, or even old oil cans.

The birdhouse below is courtesy of Tobyotter, who screwed a coffee container to a fence after adding a few drainage holes in the handle. Remember that correct drainage will help keep the nest dry.

The perch is made from a roasting skewer. Brilliant!

recycled birdhouses

Recycled birdhouses can be as simple as you want them to be.

Gourd birdhouses are another attractive addition to your yard. Decorate your gourd birdhouse with acrylic paint and apply a sealant so it can withstand being outside in the elements. Photo: Urban Hippie Love

recycled birdhouses

This recycled birdhouse is made from a gourd.

Combine salvaged wood and metal with a recycled birdhouse that has old license plates for a roof. Photo: romp

recycled birdhouses

Old license plates form the roofs of these recycled birdhouses.

The recycled oil can birdhouse below is also pretty crafty!

TIP: When it comes to building bird houses, one size does not necessarily fit all. When trying to determine birdhouse hole size, keep in mind for example that Bluebirds and House Wrens have different size requirements. Check out these excellent size specifications from Wild Bird Watching.

recycled birdhouses

If DIY Is Not Your Thing

Buy a kit. If you don’t feel like making a recycled birdhouse yourself, there are good quality ones available online. The birdhouse kit below includes everything you need.

recycled birdhouse

Just like our article on recycled plastic outdoor furniture, the benefits of a recycled plastic birdhouse are that it will not crack, peel, chip, rot or warp. The birdhouse pictured below is approved by the North American Bluebird Society and made in the USA from over 90% recycled plastics. Available online.recycled birdhouses

Making a recycled birdhouse is a rewarding activity for kids and adults alike. Whichever recycled material you choose, it’s possible to get birds to nest in any bird house you build, and they make great gifts.

Links to products featured on RecycleScene are affiliate links. We try and only feature products that close the recycling loop. Make a purchase of recommended products on our site, and we get a small percentage of affiliate commission to maintain our site. Thanks!

A Rounded Look at Fun Spoon Art

Time for a spoonful of recycled spoon art!

From whimsical sea creatures to kooky headwear or interesting antique jewelry, spoons are easily elevated from mundane kitchen drawer utensils to creative and thoughtful repurposed spoon art.

spoon art

Get creative with old silverware with spoon art. Photo by forkedupart

In addition to the great spoon art above, see other creations by ForkedUpArt, including an innovative iPhone stand. One great thing about the wonderful world of recycling is how many different ways simple, ordinary objects can be transformed and reused or recycled.

No doubt that many of you have probably seen spoon rings at local art fairs, notable for their unique vintage look once the metal oxidizes. There’s also a wide variety of spoon rings available online. The story goes that they were originally used as wedding rings in 17th century England. Servants could not afford to have wedding rings made of precious metals so they would make them from pilfered silverware.
spoon art

A visit to the Spoonman website reveals all kinds of potential in the humble spoon, as illustrated by his wide variety of curious creations.

Artist Margaret Taylor created the sweet blue bird below as an homage to the striking beauty of local wildlife. Intended for outdoor decor, it’s handmade in North Carolina using reclaimed wood along with old spindles and silverware.

spoon art

Here’s a neat recycled spoon project that keeps them on the table: place setting holders, made by hammering designs into your old spoons.

Beyond Spoon Art

One utensil to rule them all: Beyond spoon art, there are other ways to reuse utensils, you know, as actual utensils. When you’re setting the table for lunch on the go, cut out the need to carry more than necessary and stick with an all-in-one to do the job. One example is the Titanium Spork. Durable and reusable, they’re also great for letting you practice the another R in addition to the big three: Refuse. If you’ve got one of these, then just say no to cheap plastic one use forks next time you pickup some take out and use your reusable one instead.

Links to products featured on RecycleScene are affiliate links. We try and only feature products that close the recycling loop. Make a purchase of recommended products on our site, and we get a small percentage of affiliate commission to maintain our site. Thanks!

You Have to See What This Guy Makes Out of Hubcaps

Cool Hubcap Art

Ptolemy Elrington finds his inspiration on the side of the road. Elrington is the artist behind Hubcap Creatures, amazing pieces of art made entirely from recycled materials. All of the hubcaps used in his creations are found, usually, on the side of the road and bear the scratches and abrasions of their previous lives. These scars add texture and history to the creatures they decorate, and Elrington chooses not to fill, paint over or alter them in any way.

hubcap art

Hubcap Creatures are made entirely from recycled materials.

With effort and imagination, Elrington transforms an item thought worthless into something which people enjoy. Elrington states, “I come across many things which have been abandoned and find something more in them than their intrinsic worthlessness.” He’s been making hubcap sculptures for about fifteen years.

His hubcap art makes a statement about our wasteful society and about our prejudices towards value. His aim is to encourage people to reconsider before they discard something which apparently has no purpose.

As for recycling, Elrington relates, “I like the idea that every manufactured product not only has a use, but can also have a second or third use. I especially like the idea that a product could be designed with this in mind. A little research reveals the extent of the ingenuity (usually poverty driven) around the re use of so many things. An obvious example would be shoes made from car tires, but wouldn’t it be great if the designers included the further potential of their product?”

Apart from the occasional particularly choice specimen, Elrington has stopped collecting hubcaps for a while. “I have thousands now and less places to store them. The Eden Project recently donated a thousand and that just about filled me up. Prior to that I was picking up around eighty a month.

hubcap art

One of the many creations by Ptolemy Elrington made from recycled hubcaps.

“My original idea when I began collecting them was to make a full size suit of armor out of them, but I haven’t got round to it yet. The whole fish thing took on a life of its own, and then I got into sculpting out of shopping trolleys and car parts… the options are infinite.”

Elrington shares, “I’ve had a few favorite sculptures over the years but I have to be practical. I do have a living to make after all. Currently in my private collection I have a Mirror Carp, a large Archer Fish and a couple of fighter jets made out of old Dysons, but I would keep them all if I could!”

Visit hubcapcreatures.com to view his past creations, commissions, and one-of-a-kind art for sale. Hubcap Creatures is also on Facebook where you’ll find a lot more photos of hubcap art.

Links to products featured on RecycleScene are affiliate links. We try and only feature products that close the recycling loop. Make a purchase of recommended products on our site, and we get a small percentage of affiliate commission to maintain our site. Thanks!